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Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
11-16-2014, 11:26 PM
Post: #11
RE: Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
I'm very glad you posted a link to the visualization, as I was immediately shocked at the complexity of this graph. The only way that this visualization could succeed is with some sort of interactivity.

As for interactivity, I feel that the mouse-over filtering is very effective, however, as the op critiqued, the color scheme was ineffective. Specifically, when lines were emphasized by mousing over, the saturation of the line colors was too greyed out. It would have been better if the lines being emphasized were much more vivid, while all other lines were even more greyed out.

Despite this, the creators of the visual do fix the ambiguous node line relationships, somewhat, by allowing the user to click and zoom. Showing only these pertinent relationships could have been made better by allowing the user to rearrange the nodes. This would have allowed the user to explore and disambiguate any overlapping or clustered lines.

Other than that, this is a very informative visualization.
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11-17-2014, 01:09 AM
Post: #12
RE: Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
I felt that Roozbeh Gh. critiques were very informative and Roozbeh Gh.'s final critique was spot on. Overall I'm having a hard time giving the designers 5 stars. One of the specific techniques I thought was used poorly was the interactive animation. Beyond the basic interactivity of focus + context and highlighting I would classify the designers use of this technique under unnecessary chart junk. Specifically, after selecting/hovering over a particular node all of the other nodes bounced around too much making it difficult to focus on the data being presented. Additionally, many of the encoding channels were not very well presented or defined i.e. capitalization as a classification scheme, line style etc.

I liked that the designers attempted to display such complex relationships with a node-linked diagram. It was a generous attempt but ultimately didn't present the data very well due to the unnecessary chart junk.
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11-18-2014, 10:29 AM
Post: #13
RE: Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
Like Roozbeh said, at the first glance doesn't give you any useful information because the vis is SO dense. The interactivity, where hovering over a location or group highlights those connections and fades all others, helps a lot. However, I find the jiggling (caused by physics calculations?) to be distracting and not at all useful. I also agree that the colors are a poor choice.

To improve this visualization I would change the color scheme and get rid of the physics optimization (and just have "static" interactivity).
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12-08-2014, 12:10 AM
Post: #14
RE: Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
I have my own thought of this visualization, but I don't want this to subject to take a different track.
I like the idea of the visualization, things are complicated in the middle east and this vis does a good job simplifying the relationships. I was hoping for more details as when did the relationship between two countries changed, and for what reason, since knowing two countries are not friends is not enough.
Some of the relationships between these countries are changing constantly, and so its hard to tell if these lines are accurate.
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12-08-2014, 02:40 AM
Post: #15
RE: Week 12: Who likes whom in the middle east?
I have seen this visualization before, and I would say, the node-linked diagram with different color of edges to represent different kinds of relationships between different communities is very relevant. And definitely filtering the interaction with the node that the mouse hovers on is very important and aptly done.

But like someone has already mentioned I felt the animation of bouncing when a node is touched is a little overdone, which I felt annoying after doing it a couple of times.
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