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Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
10-01-2014, 08:06 PM
Post: #1
Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
The visualization can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/...ref=sports

Comments: I like the idea behind the visualization. This visualization reflects the achievements of Derek Jeter.
Critiques:
Positive:
- The visualization looks attractive
- It covers all the important achievements
- The font size and the color selection seems fine too
- The effects are connected to scrolling down (works for both, mouse & keyboard)
- Motion effect: Showing the player in action
- Numerical value of each box when scrolling down along with motion effect
- Number of swings needed to hit home runs, swings during practice and indoor batting cage, etc.
Negative:
- Even though the visualization is attractive, showing him swing his bat for 3,663 (for later, I couldn't see the motion although it might still be there) is not the most efficient way of representing it.
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10-02-2014, 09:37 PM
Post: #2
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
The idea of the visualization is cool, however, I think there is a lack of presenting the information. If a better font was used, maybe a little work on the left side information would be great, adding some colors, and making the visualization more focused on the data. the swings are great and for sure look good, but does it really help the visualization ? I was more interested on the swings than the actual data, where the visualization lost its own goal which is representing Derek's career. Overall I think it is simple, clear, and showed me a new way of visualizing.
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10-03-2014, 09:24 PM
Post: #3
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
(10-01-2014 08:06 PM)ankit Wrote:  - Even though the visualization is attractive, showing him swing his bat for 3,663 (for later, I couldn't see the motion although it might still be there) is not the most efficient way of representing it.

Agree. At first this vis really surprised me. It's my first time seeing this kind of rolling vis. It's attractive, interesting and making sense. However, after a certain number, the background become totally dark. it's kind of boring. There must be a way to put something behind. Also, I think it will be better if the boundaries of these numbers can become stronger.
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10-04-2014, 09:04 PM
Post: #4
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
This visualization shows the number of swings Derek Jeter took up to accomplishing certain tasks, for example it took him about 1,300 swings per home run. I think the visualization is fun and very clean. I don't care for baseball but I enjoyed scrolling through it. The visualization uses area to encode the amount of swings Jeter has taken and allows the user to interact with the visualization to compare the number of swings up until different points culminating with the number of swings over his career. This is not the most effective channel for comparison but a lot of information is presented as text on the side which I found complemented the graphic well. Overall I think it is an effective visualization.
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10-05-2014, 09:22 AM
Post: #5
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
Although this visualization is unique, I didn't really like it (and think it is ineffective) for a couple of reasons. First, at the lower levels (primarily the first 2), since motion is such a salient channel, I had trouble reading because I was distracted by the animation. Second, at higher levels, as other people have mentioned, the animation can no longer be seen. And at the highest levels, I couldn't even see the dot representing the animation anymore!

I think that this was a neat idea, but poorly implemented.
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10-05-2014, 01:06 PM
Post: #6
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
I found this visualization to be really very cool. The idea is unique. It shows number of swings of the player in his career in very interactive way. I liked the labeling done for every task.
Although it is cool, after some time, when number of swings are increased, it becomes difficult to see the motion. It is just entertaining but not effective. At the end, visualization becomes too dark and it is difficult to read the comments on each box. The font size is too small. This could have been improved.
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10-05-2014, 10:17 PM
Post: #7
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
First I would like to appreciate Ankit for a fantastic critique, I completely agree with the post what he has critiqued.

The visualization is completely appealing and perfect to some extent but the problem with the viz is that it should portray the actual data of how he contributed to team wins in the graph provided either with numbers or as a percentage of total data.

The color of the chart should have been more eye clear and appealing.

The critique's decision to improve the viz is perfect and really appreciated
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10-05-2014, 10:45 PM
Post: #8
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
Concerning your criticism about showing him swing his bat 3,663 times and starting to lose sight of the bat swinging animation, what would you propose as a better alternative? I'm not sure how the visualization could be improved to allow for bat swinging animations when we get into higher numbers. I thought the visualization did a good job of establishing a sense of endless bat swinging that transitions into squares that help us visualize the difference between number sizes.

The number of swings needed to achieve home runs was an interesting number. It would be interesting to see a visualization comparing players' home run efficiency. This reminded me of a character in the movie “Signs” by M. Night Shyamalan who played minor league baseball and always swung the bat as hard as he could. He had the worst batting efficiency rating, but he owned all the hitting distance records.

I agree that the motion effect was effective. When I first looked at the visualization I was thinking, “is this animation going to stop soon?” But then as I proceeded, I understood that the idea conveyed is that Derek Jeter swings the bat over and over again for many years.
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10-05-2014, 10:50 PM
Post: #9
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
I think the animation is general is distracting. There really is not much reason for it. The visualization is very good at showing perspective of how many swings he really took. These kind of stuff is also useful for money. When we here about trillions of dollars spent it is really hard to visualize it but if you were to put it in a visualization like this we would have a way to comprehend how huge that amount of data is. That is why this visualization is so effective it allows us to see something that it has to really imagine.
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10-06-2014, 12:12 AM
Post: #10
RE: Week 6: 342,000 swings later,Derek Jeter calls it a career
Wow, this visualization is so cool, i think it is the coolest visualization ever, i really like the motion effect. and i totally agree with ankit's view. And i also think even though this visualization, but whe i see it for a relly long time, i feel a little uncomfortable. But in general, i do think this visualization is effective to give enough detailed information.
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