Thread Closed 
Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
12-08-2014, 12:18 AM
Post: #11
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
I actually really like this visualization. I think the interaction is what really makes this work. The designer of the vis could have easily made this static with different colors representing each color. Instead, highlighting a line on mouse-over effectively allows the user to make easy comparisons with the US lines. I would agree with some of the postings here that the visualization is slightly dull. While a more vibrant hue could have been used for the lines, it would just be fluff. Still, a little more of an eye catching visualization would have been nice. As for space utilization, I think that the designer could have taken measures to make each line more distinct and a little less clustered.
Find all posts by this user
12-08-2014, 12:36 AM
Post: #12
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
I liked the visualization in general. The visualization is simple and conveys the point. The dip in American salaries is quite recent which might be because of the recession. I liked the smoothing feature. It was easier to interpret the point with smoothed out lines. As people have suggested earlier the hovering effect is one of the strong aspects of this vis. There could have been a time filter as well.
Find all posts by this user
12-08-2014, 01:04 AM
Post: #13
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
I really liked this critique. I agree with almost everything lzhang said. I felt the interactivity was excellent.

I have a couple of detail-oriented problems with this visualization. The first is that the visualization does not seem to strongly support the main argument in the article. The term "Middle class" is never clearly defined. Is it simply the median, or everyone from the x-th percentile to the y-th percentile? With the exception of Canada, the US seems to have higher incomes from the 40th percentile on up. The article focuses on the rate of income growth for most of their numbers, but then claim that the US is falling behind in income and not just the rate of growth.

The second point is that this chart compares income, but almost no mention is made of cost of living. This makes a huge difference. In many parts of Utah, $30,000 per year is enough to raise a family. In large cities, like New York City, where rent is usually well above $1000 for a very small apartment (source: http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/cit...rk%2C+NY), $30,000 might be a living wage for one person. Without some information about the cost of living in each of the countries listed, the income data is almost meaningless.
Find all posts by this user
12-08-2014, 06:11 AM
Post: #14
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
This visualization critique was very good. I agree with everything. To have a legend of the different countries would be very helpful. I also think that the color encoding choice is very good. It clearly shows that you are singling out the United States and giving it the spotlight. but still showing the other individual countries if that is what you want to see. So I was expecting that the figure was going to show that the middle percentile was going to be less than the other countries but it was the last or lowest percentile that showed this trend. I didn't feel that was very convincing that if the argument is that middle class US citizens are the sole part of the argument. Other than that it was a great visualization.
Find all posts by this user
12-08-2014, 02:55 PM
Post: #15
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
The visualization is pretty impressive, especially the one comparing incoming on various percentiles. Instead of drawing a long jagged line, the author used line segments to emphasize the comparison for difference percentiles. Smoothing helps viewers better capture the difference. And highlighting the US line makes viewers easy to spot the point.

Another impressive thing is the visualization is conveyed in a contextual contrastive way. The first image shows the once-strong lead, then show some more detailed analysis, and then give a final conclusion to overturn previous conception.

One possible improvement to my perspective is, I would like to see the trend of other countries. It's unlikely just US's 30 percentile middle class is left behind and every other countries are surging. There can be more interactivity to toggle the highlighting for each country's each percentile.
Find all posts by this user
12-12-2014, 05:40 PM
Post: #16
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
I think this is a very effective visualization. I like that it uses small multiple to represent the information for different categories of income over time. It shows a lot of comparable information in a single glance without any need to scroll the page.
I like the clean color coding used to compare the plots for all countries with USA. The option to apply smoothing of the curves or not is an added bonus. The smoothed curves a nice overview of the rate of change in the income of the income category over time.
Find all posts by this user
12-14-2014, 11:01 PM
Post: #17
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
I'm pretty happy about this visualization, and it is good for its purpose where I think it represents a lot of data in a simple creative way. The mouse hover was the first thing that caught my attention, where it was done nicely, where the lines color changes to be darker and the name of the country shows up, pretty useful and limits the use of color and simplifies the visualization. The smoothing effect is a good addition to the visualization, since it gives an overall view to the reader and a view with details if the reader is more interested in numbers.
After reading some of the comments above, I think there are a lot of the cons are not pretty accurate, where for example allowing to compare two different countries in the visualization isn't a good idea since the topic is about the U.S. and allowing that to happen would not help the purpose of the article. Adding more countries would probably be a better addition to the visualization. The years from been shorten to 80 and 10, where I think it's pretty obvious and it shouldn't be really misleading the reader at all, a better suggestion would be mentioning that these are from 1980 - 2010 one time and that its it, because what we have in the visualization right now is redone it.
Overall, as I said the visualization is good and serve the goal the article is trying to reach.
Find all posts by this user
12-17-2014, 02:22 PM
Post: #18
RE: Week 14: Income Change in U.S. and Other Advanced Countries
The critique is well organised.

Although remove smoothing is useful in discrete comparisons over the time range, the remove smoothing data was not available for some time range, but smoothing gives a complete regression line for the whole time range.
Other than this, I felt visualization was perfect in comparison. It did a good job in changing the legend each we hover over a new country. Although list of all countries would have been helpful.
Find all posts by this user
Thread Closed 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)